Sassy, No Spoilers: All the Ugly and Wonderful Things

book of the month selection, book reviews, contemporary, fiction

Y’all ever just start reading a book that you’re not REAL sure about, because so many people have some really strong feelings about it? Some say it’s their favorite book of the year, others say it’s offensive trash. I love books that spark a hot debate from all sides, because that tells me the author did something right.

Also, if someone says a book is “offensive trash,” guess what? My inner John-Waters-loving-self is going to see what’s going on.

The thing about this book that rubs people the wrong way, is that it’s a coming-of-age love story between a man and a young woman. Well, she starts out as a young girl, growing up in a world of abuse with her meth-lab family. See how that could get offensive, real quick? Yeah.

So, I didn’t think All the Ugly and Wonderful Things was offensive, much in the same way that I am not appalled by Lolita. I see them both as very ugly stories that aren’t ugly at the core, but that can be easily seen that way (can we say, judging a book by its cover? I think we can!). The beautiful things about this story are its two main characters, Wavy and Kellen; they are written in such a way that you instantly see the connection between them, and the whole point of this book (I think) is that it shows what the power of characterization can do. It can make you pull for the bad guy (Breaking Bad, anyone?), and REALLY question your own morals. At the end if this book, you can’t deny that you’re weirdly pulling for these two crazy kids to just work it out.

But that’s what’s so great about this book! The backdrop is unique in this book, and the ugliness of it only makes it that much more beautiful. I found myself cheering for Wavy and Kellen, and marveling over the brilliant way Greenwood built their world.

This book isn’t for everyone, sure, but I would recommend it to:

  • People who actually enjoyed Lolita as literature (I know I’m not the only one)
  • Anyone who loves a book with amazing character building
  • Those interested in questioning their very moral center and reading “uncomfortable” stories
  • People who enjoy reading books that create debates

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Sassy, No Spoilers: Lock Every Door

book of the month selection, book reviews

Housesitting for a cursed replica of the Dakota? Creepy wallpaper? Yes, please.

Let’s talk about Satan’s spawn. No, I don’t mean Donald Trump (that’s a whole different review and would be way more bleak than this one).

I mean Rosemary’s Baby. If you read Ira Levin’s book (that one and Stepford Wives) and was obsessed with it like I was (I mean, it’s a thinly-veiled satire about women’s rights? Yes, thank you)—then you’ll appreciate the nod (and dedication on the first page) that Riley Sager gives to Levin in Lock Every Door.

The first thing you need to know about me is that I love creepy, abandoned, or weird buildings with a haunted history. On a real deep, “I will now annoy you with one million facts you did not want to know” level. Perhaps taking the number one spot (maybe in the world?) of creeptastic dwellings would be the infamous Dakota Apartments in New York City. The Dakota has inspired many a book (Rosemary’s Baby called it the Bramford, and a stunning memoir by Wendy Lawless, Chanel Bonfire dives into the life of growing up in the Dakota)—and Lock Every Door nods to the Dakota, but takes place in a near-replica down the street (the Bartholomew).

So, the quick and dirty: girl takes “too good to be true” job housesitting a vacant apartment in the prestigious building. She’s jobless, just found her boyfriend cheating on her, and has no family. This “housesitting” job promises to pay $12,000 for 3 months of living in luxury. Sounds like a dream, right? Well, let’s just say it becomes more like a nightmare. No spoilers.

This book is an especially fun read for people who wonder—what exactly happened here?—when they step inside a creepy old building. And:

  • People who like to research murders/cults/mysterious occurrences before traveling (I know I’m not the only one)
  • Current/former broke af house-sitters (guilty)
  • Fans of gargoyles
  • Lovers of wallpaper (again, guilty)

Rating: 4 out of 5.