Sassy, No Spoilers: Lock Every Door

book of the month selection, book reviews

Housesitting for a cursed replica of the Dakota? Creepy wallpaper? Yes, please.

Let’s talk about Satan’s spawn. No, I don’t mean Donald Trump (that’s a whole different review and would be way more bleak than this one).

I mean Rosemary’s Baby. If you read Ira Levin’s book (that one and Stepford Wives) and was obsessed with it like I was (I mean, it’s a thinly-veiled satire about women’s rights? Yes, thank you)—then you’ll appreciate the nod (and dedication on the first page) that Riley Sager gives to Levin in Lock Every Door.

The first thing you need to know about me is that I love creepy, abandoned, or weird buildings with a haunted history. On a real deep, “I will now annoy you with one million facts you did not want to know” level. Perhaps taking the number one spot (maybe in the world?) of creeptastic dwellings would be the infamous Dakota Apartments in New York City. The Dakota has inspired many a book (Rosemary’s Baby called it the Bramford, and a stunning memoir by Wendy Lawless, Chanel Bonfire dives into the life of growing up in the Dakota)—and Lock Every Door nods to the Dakota, but takes place in a near-replica down the street (the Bartholomew).

So, the quick and dirty: girl takes “too good to be true” job housesitting a vacant apartment in the prestigious building. She’s jobless, just found her boyfriend cheating on her, and has no family. This “housesitting” job promises to pay $12,000 for 3 months of living in luxury. Sounds like a dream, right? Well, let’s just say it becomes more like a nightmare. No spoilers.

This book is an especially fun read for people who wonder—what exactly happened here?—when they step inside a creepy old building. And:

  • People who like to research murders/cults/mysterious occurrences before traveling (I know I’m not the only one)
  • Current/former broke af house-sitters (guilty)
  • Fans of gargoyles
  • Lovers of wallpaper (again, guilty)

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Sassy, No Spoilers: The Guest List

book of the month selection, book reviews, Cults

A wedding on a creepy, former cult locale on an Irish island? A sinister murder? Yes, please.

Okay, full disclosure: I grew up with a wedding-photographer Dad, and my teenage job was to follow him around, schlepping heavy camera equipment and listening to the same speeches every. Single. Weekend. For real; sometimes we’d shoot five weddings in one weekend. People love spending money on giant weddings in the South.

So you could say, I got a little tired of the whole wedding thing, I even wrote about it for a literary journal (republished at Cultural Weekly). Once you hear “I’m just so glad it’s over,” and the same “Love is not…” speech, along with every DJ’s playlist consisting of “Brick House,” “Electric Slide,” and “Celebration.”

Weddings became my Groundhog Day.

So when I picked Lucy Foley’s The Guest List as my Book of the Month selection, I was excited to see what parallels there were between my understanding of weddings, and what that would look like against a creepy, secluded Irish island landscape.

It did not disappoint.

Told in multiple perspectives of the wedding party, TGL makes us feel like maybe we should spare no expense on our weddings, especially if they are to take place on a secluded island with a cult history.

No? Just me? Okay.

Readers have compared this book to Agathie Christie’s cozy mysteries, and I would agree. The story was fun, it was a super quick read, but it left me wanting to know more about the characters–especially the owners of the castle. And the background of the island; if you promise me a creepy history, I want. To. Know. Everything. And I felt that was lacking here.

Still a fun read; I recommend The Guest List for fellow weirdos like me who enjoy:

  • Moidahh mysteries in exotic locales
  • Cult-y implications
  • Weddings gone wrong. Very wrong
  • Books told in multiple viewpoints
  • You’re going on an exotic island vacation and you want to give yourself the creeps

Rating: 2.5 out of 5.

Sassy, No Spoilers: My Best Friend’s Exorcism

book reviews

Demons, cults, and teenage angst in the 80’s? Yes, please.

Deep in the throngs of editing my cult-based thriller, I decided to pick up books that might lend a helping hand in keeping things ~spooky~ but ~not too spooky~ because I like to sleep with the lights off and not thinking about what might be lurking in the closet (not that there’s much room in there for ghosts, I have a lot of craft supplies in there, sorry, Casper).

I first noticed My Best Friend’s Exorcism by Grady Hendrix at my library. I work in a public library; I scan a lot of books every day. I scanned a copy of this one in a transit bin, and instantly gasped, called my coworker over, and Oo’d and Ahh’d, because it has the. Coolest. Cover. I have ever seen. I didn’t check out the book, because it had a hold on it elsewhere (and I wouldn’t cheat y’all like that, library folk do follow rules). And as a rule of thumb, if I think I will like a book, I buy it. (Support! Authors! And! Bookshops!)

*pencil pouch, legwarmers, and holy water not included

The author of this book isn’t a novice, but he’s just landed himself a lot of (deserved) attention with The Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying Vampires, Which is sitting in my TBR pile glaring at me as I type this. He also wrote a satirical take on a haunted version of IKEA. I love finding authors that take horror and smash it against humor (True Blood, anyone?), and that’s exactly what Hendrix accomplishes with MBFE.

To stay true to my name, I won’t spoil anything about this book. But I will say, it’s about two best friends in the 80’s who stand by each other…no matter what. What would you do if your best friend suddenly started acting like a total demon? Typical teenagers, amiright? This book is a wild ride through all things nostalgia, exorcists that are super swole for Jesus, and the limitless things we do for best friends.

Judge this book by the cover, I give you library-lady permission, and I also guarantee the song-lyrics-as-chapter-titles will have you jamming John Hughes movie soundtracks for weeks afterwards.

Read this book if you enjoy:

  • E.T. references
  • Stranger Things
  • The entire wild ride that was the True Blood series by Charlaine Harris
  • 80s nostalgia
  • Stories about insanely strong friendships

Also, if you were traumatized by The Exorcist as a child like I was, then this book will make you feel a lot better about it. Legwarmers are optional.

Rating: 4 out of 5.